Rare Disease Day is tomorrow! How Mark2Cure is gearing up for the NGLY1 Community

Although our beta experiment has ended, the wonderful people who’ve joined Mark2Cure are still going strong about helping us. That energy and enthusiasm is inspiring, and we’d love to have your input as we develop Mark2Cure for the next phase.

The next launch of Mark2Cure is going to be big! (ok, maybe small by Zooniverse’s standards, but big for us!) Many Mark2Curators have offered us assistance and we will take all the help we can get. If you love to share on social media channels or have access to other venues you feel are appropriate for Mark2Cure, we’d love for you to join our Street & Tweet team and help us spread the word about Mark2Cure. If you are in San Diego and want to share your input as we develop the tutorials for the next phase, we’d love to have you as part of our User Experience team. If you’re not in San Diego, you can join our Virtual User Experience team.

This post was originally written for Mark2Cure and can be viewed in its entirety here.

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BioGPS Featured Article – Identification of Novel Tumor-Associated Cell Surface Sialoglycoproteins in Human Glioblastoma Tumors Using Quantitative Proteomics | The Su Lab

BioGPS Featured Article – Identification of Novel Tumor-Associated Cell Surface Sialoglycoproteins in Human Glioblastoma Tumors Using Quantitative Proteomics | The Su Lab.

Glioblastoma Multiforme is one of the most common and difficult to treat forms of brain cancer. Because it’s often aggressive and deadly, researchers (like the ones responsible for this week’s BioGPS featured article) have been working hard to uncover new therapeutic approaches for treating this disease. In this study, researchers employed proteomic profiling in conjunction with a technology termed >“bioorthogonal chemical reporter” (BOCR) strategy and LFQ-MS in order to analyze cell surface sialoglycoproteins in cells derived from GBM tumor patients.

Get the scoop on this week’s BioGPS featured article here

Read the

We’re almost there! Mark2Cure now at 80% completion of the Beta Experiment

Because of the amazing ways in which our Mark2Curators have contributed, we’re now approaching the end of the beta experiment. Since our last post on Tuesday, we’ve gone from 56% completion to ~80% completion of the beta experiment. THANK YOU, Mark2Curators, please continue to contribute and help us finish it!

We're almost there! Help us finish this!
We’re almost there! Help us finish this!

After demonstrating that citizen scientists have what it takes to get the work done, our next step will be to demonstrate that the work done by Mark2Curators can be incredibly valuable to the research community. In this next phase, we expect to tackle NGLY1 and sincerely hope that you will help researchers answer questions about this rare genetic disease. Learn more about NGLY1 here.

The NGLY1 community has been very active in Mark2Cure. Matthew and Cristina Might have been working hard over the years to find cure for their son (and the first patient diagnosed with this disease), Bertrand. You can read more about their incredible story here and here. Matthew and other researchers studying NGLY1 have provided us with questions they think can be answered by the work of Mark2Curators like yourself. Cristina has helped a lot to recruit contributors and introduced Mark2Cure to contacts at the Missouri Military Academy (Team MMA, you guys rock!)

Once the beta experiment ends, our email updates may be less frequent in order to avoid annoying anyone. For those who are interested in keeping up with the newest developments in Mark2Cure, please visit the Mark2Cure blog which we will continue to update on a weekly basis. We will post the results of our beta experiment here as soon as they’re available.

Check out Andrew’s interview on with Daniel Levine on RARECast!

This post was originally written for Mark2Cure and can be viewed in its entirety here.

BioGPS Featured Article – Constrained transcription factor spacing is prevalent and important for transcriptional control of mouse blood cells | The Su Lab

BioGPS Featured Article – Constrained transcription factor spacing is prevalent and important for transcriptional control of mouse blood cells | The Su Lab.

Here’s some quick background for this week’s BioGPS featured article. transcription factors play an important role in gene expression, but there’s still a lot to be learned with regards to how they actually work.

The authors of this paper chose to use mouse haematopoiesis as a model for learning more about how transcription factors work because the spacing between DNA binding motifs has been reported to be functionally important in mouse haematopoiesis.

Learn more about what the authors found with the BioGPS Featured Article post or check out the open-access article.

Finally, checkout the tools the authors behind this paper have worked on: CODEX (formerly HAEMCODE)

Why do people Mark2Cure?

Why do people Mark2Cure? | The Su Lab.

Mark2Curators have been busy! Over the weekend, our volunteers brought the current beta experiment from about 28% completion to over 50% completion. We’ve gotten excellent feedback from you and are working to improve on the issues and suggestions you’ve sent us! Thank you and keep them coming!!!

We're at 56% complete as of this morning--double where we were last Friday Morning!
We’re at 56% complete as of this morning–double where we were last Friday Morning!

We now have over a hundred registered Mark2Curators who have shared compelling reasons as to why they Mark2Cure.

If we categorize the reasons, they look something like this:

Why do people Mark2Cure? If we categorized it, people Mark2Cure because...
Why do people Mark2Cure? If we categorized it, people Mark2Cure because…

We know all of our Mark2curators are altruistic, else they wouldn’t be contributing, but many have their reasons for doing so. For over half of our Mark2Curators, the primary motivation for contributing is to help others! How awesome is that? About half of our Mark2Curators were motivated by their interested in health and science. About 25% of our Mark2Curators were motivated by disease ties, with >70% of the disease ties being rare diseases. If you’re wondering why the sum of the percentages is over 100%, it’s because many reasons cannot neatly be contained by a single category.
 
If a picture is worth a thousand words? What's a picture formed from the words of our Mark2Curators worth?  ...priceless!
If a picture is worth a thousand words? What’s a picture formed from the words of our Mark2Curators worth? …priceless!

This post was originally written for Mark2Cure and can be viewed in its entirety here.